November 25, 2015 Volume XXV, No. 09

An unwritten part of all athletic trainers’ job descriptions, mentoring has a long tradition in the profession. Here’s how to provide the right guidance.

The following article appears in the December 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Becky Bower

“Every man must decide whether he will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness.”


Frequently misdiagnosed as asthma, vocal cord dysfunction-exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction may be present in as high as five percent of athletes. These authors are working hard to educate their peers about the condition.

The following article appears in the December 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Mike Matheny and Mary Pitti


A keen attention to detail during offseason training has helped the University of Florida baseball team develop the physical and mental discipline needed to earn six consecutive NCAA Division I tournament berths.

The following article appears in the December 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Paul Chandler


Through mindfulness meditation, student-athletes at West Virginia University are learning to be aware of the present and shut out distractions, leading to enhanced performance both on the field and off.

The following article appears in the December 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Dr. Michael Brumage and Dr. Mike Gross


The following article appears in the December 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

The dietary needs of female athletes are often buried behind misrepresentation or misinformation. Our expert shines some light on the topic.  

By Dr. Susan Kleiner


The following article appears in the December 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

Few athletic trainers have had their name appear in our pages more than Maria Hutsick, MS, ATC, LAT, CSCS. That’s because few have had a career as influential and trailblazing as hers.


The following are the "Ten Principles for Strength and Conditioning" developed by Boyd Epley at the University of Nebraska in 1991.

1.  Multiple-Joint Actions

Incorporate exercises that integrate muscle chains to regulate the function of linked multiple joint actions.

2. Ground-Based Activities

Select activities that apply muscular force with feet against the ground.

3. Three-Dimensional Movements