September 9, 2015 Volume XXV, No. 06

An offseason strength and conditioning program split into eight dedicated training phases helped prepare the University of Michigan softball team for a deep postseason run in 2015.

The following article appears in the September 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Lew Porchiazzo


One of the biggest trends to hit the performance field in recent years, wearable GPS devices are changing the way athletes train and recover. We asked leading strength coaches how they are making the most of the technology.

The following article appears in the September 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Joel Bergeron


A tweet here, a blog post there—do you give much thought to your social media presence? This author explains how to devise an effective, comprehensive online strategy.

The following article appears in the September 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Mike Hopper


Nontraditional sports continue to gain in popularity. Now may be the perfect time to sell them on athletic training services.

The following article appears in the September 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Erik Nason


In the year since the NCAA loosened rules on feeding athletes, many schools have upgraded their nutritional offerings. The University of Arkansas has implemented a three-pronged plan that places a premium on convenience and variety.

The following article appears in the September 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

By Katie Raines

Katie Raines, MS, RD, LD, is the Sports Nutritionist for the University of Arkansas athletic department. She can be reached at: kraines@uark.edu.


The following article appears in the September 2015 issue of Training & Conditioning.

When Training & Conditioning first spoke with Sandra Shultz, PhD, ATC, CSCS, FACSM, for our December 1993 issue, she was Associate Director of Athletic Training and Rehabilitation at UCLA, and the topic was using ankle braces to protect Bruin athletes. Nearly a quarter-century later, Shultz is Chair of the Department of Kinesiology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and one of the world’s preeminent voices on ACL research.


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