January 29, 2015
By Mary Kate Murphy When Will Hicks, CSCS, started out in the strength and conditioning field as an Athletic Improvement Coach at North Carolina State University in 1985, none of his current football players were born yet. When he came to Syracuse University in 2000 to be the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach, most were likely just entering elementary school. But because of his constant dedication to learning, adapting, and most of all, caring, current Orange football players are the beneficiaries of Hicks's 29 years of experience.
January 29, 2015
For more than 50 years, Dr. Bob Ward has been finding better ways to improve athletic performance. But many of his ideas take time and data to implement properly--time and data that a lot strength and conditioning coaches just don't have.
January 29, 2015
NCAA To Vote on Sports Medical Issues Student-athlete health and safety is the subject of upcoming NCAA legislation thanks to a new set of initiatives developed by its Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports (CSMAS). At the annual NCAA Convention in January, leaders from all three divisions will vote separately on the proposals.
January 29, 2015
Pocatello (Idaho) School District In most sports, when an injury occurs during a competition, the rest of the participants are asked to step away to give the athletic trainer room to operate. However, when Brent Faure, MS, ATC, EMT, covers rodeo, he actually welcomes people hovering over him as he's treating an injured rider. That's because there's often a bull or horse still in the ring with them.
January 29, 2015
A roundtable of strength coaches offer their thoughts on tracking and improving athletes' performance, as well as their own, through testing.By Dennis Read Dennis Read is an Associate Editor at Training & Conditioning. He can be reached at: dr@MomentumMedia.com. Sports are a bottom-line endeavor. Most contests have a clear winner and loser, and the results are there for all to see. Athletes are judged by how they perform in the heat of competition, but the evaluations don't stop there.
January 29, 2015
When an athlete is diagnosed with Crohn's disease, continuing to compete can seem overwhelming. Here's how to help them tackle this difficult condition.By Lauren Cahoon Roberts Lauren Cahoon Roberts is a freelance writer based in Ithaca, N.Y., who has covered issues in health and wellness for a broad range of publications. She can be reached at: Cahoon.lauren@gmail.com

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