January 29, 2015
The Youth Sports Safety Alliance, composed of more than 100 organizations committed to keeping young athletes safe, launched the first-ever "National Action Plan for Sports Safety" to ensure comprehensive action to protect America's student-athletes. The Plan was finalized by those in attendance at the fourth annual Youth Sports Safety Summit in Washington, D.C. on Feb. 5, which was convened by the NATA.
January 29, 2015
By Vern Gambetta How can you call something a functional movement screen when most of the test's movements are in positions that are at low levels of function for any athletic body? For me, screening while using artificial movements in a sterile environment is of little to no value. Instead, I think it's important to keep in mind that athletes have three movement constants: the body, the ground, and gravity. In movement assessment, we want to see the effect of gravity on the body and how the body effectively uses the ground to stabilize, produce, and reduce force.
January 29, 2015
Proving that the future of athletic training is ripe with rhythm, students from the St. Cloud State University Athletic Training Education Program recently produced their own version of the "Harlem Shake," a dance routine that has taken the Internet by storm. Enjoy.
January 29, 2015
Starting next season, all 32 NFL teams will conduct sideline head injury evaluations using iPads outfitted with concussion assessment software. According to The New York Times, the app was used by a handful of teams as part of a pilot program last season. The hope is that being able to compare the results of a baseline test against a post-injury exam side by side in real time will help doctors and athletic trainers quickly recognize when a concussion has occurred and guide them in removing that player from the competition.
January 29, 2015
Brain Changes Linger Following Concussion Are high school and youth athletes returning to play too soon after suffering a concussion? Data from recent research suggests that the answer is yes. A study published in the Dec. 12 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience found that structural changes in a child's brain persist for months following a concussion, even after symptoms have subsided.

Pages

Stay at the Top of Your Game!
x
Receive articles like this by signing up for our newsletters